Board of Library Trustees Meeting
January 3, 2012

7:00 p.m.


Medway Public Library


Attendees:

Trustees:

Carol Brown, Vice-chair
MaryAnn Cabibbo
Ed Duggan
Chris Monahan
William Roberts, Secretary
Wendy Rowe, Chair

Citizens:

Anthony Pacholec, Finance Committee member responsible for Library's budget
Margaret Perkins, Acting Director

  1. Approval of agenda
  2. Motion to approve the agenda, CM1,MAC2, passed unanimously

  3. Secretary's Report
  4. Motion to approve the minutes, MAC1, CM2, 5-0-1 (Bill abstained)

  5. Citizens Speak
  6. Tony asked about cooperation with the schools. Some areas of cooperation mentioned were:

    More could be done if the library had a children's librarian.

  7. Budget Report
  8. Director's Report
  9. Will have a press release pleading for the donation of a Kindle & a Nook. The staff could then be familiarized with their use and be of more help to patrons, demonstrating their use and letting patrons try them out in the library.

  10. Old Business
  11. New Business
  12. Fundraising
  13. Adjournment; next meeting February 7 (BOS plan to attend)
  14. Motion to adjourn: 9:20PM. MAC1, CM2, passed unanimously


Budget Report

Director's Report

Medway Public Library

Director’s Report

January 3, 2011



Emergency Transfer

The FinCom approved the Emergency Transfer for the HVAC equipment at their December meeting. The Emergency Transfer form has been signed by the Selectmen and the FinCom.

FY13 Budget

The budget process for FY13 has begun. The Board of Selectmen anticipate an increase in state aid of 2%. The impact worksheet and departmental narrative, as well as the entry into MUNIS of a budget with level-funded expenses and level-funded salaries (after incorporating contracted increases) are due by January 6th. The library's target budget, received from the Town Accountant, includes expenses of $63,801, and salaries of $152,817, for a total of $216,618. I will meet with Melanie Phillips, the Finance Director, and Carol Pratt, the Town Accountant, to review the budget on January 12th.

Building Maintenance

The Town has contracted with a vendor to replace the thermostatic controls with a computerized setup in the Library and other Town buildings. The vendor was at the library for several days installing equipment, and will return to install the Network Control device at some point. They will then train the staff on how to use the Network Control device and the thermostats. It will be possible to make adjustments remotely, via the Internet.

Once again, water seeped into the Tech Services office. Building maintenance came to look at it, but I need to find a professional basement waterproofing person to evaluate the problem and provide an estimate to fix it once and for all. Katherine moved her computer to the opposite wall so it would stay dry.

We have had a recurring problem with virus/rogue attacks, so I reinstalled Windows XP, Millennium, and security software on the Tech Services computer, and the new Network Engineer came over with the Volume Licensing information to reinstall Microsoft Office.

Personnel

The town added $9483.00 to the library's salary budget, to cover the salary increases.

Programming

The Medway Cultural Council funded two summer library programs, and most of a family astronomy program that will be held in March or April.

In response to patron requests, I have asked Lorie to move her next story hour series to winter rather than spring. This will require some extra preparation time to incorporate winter themes.



Numerous gingerbread houses were displayed in the library in December. Wendy photographed them all and put them on the library's web site. Some of the photographs were also printed in the newspaper. The Friends' Gingerbread Festival was very successful, with about 90 children signed up.

Overdrive

There have been numerous requests recently for information and for help downloading eBooks using Overdrive. It would be very helpful if the library owned at least one Nook and one Kindle, in order to familiarize the staff with their use, and to allow staff to demonstrate their use to patrons, as well as give patrons a chance to try them out it the library. I plan to work with the Friends to see if local businesses or individuals would be willing to donate some eReaders. The Massachusetts Library System recommends buying more eBooks, rather than spending money on buying multiple eReaders to circulate.

A patron in Holliston objected to a couple of eBooks, at least one of which was displayed at the top of Minuteman's Digital Media Catalog page under New eBooks. At the time, there was no established procedure or policy to follow in such cases, but the Overdrive group is now modifying the old Internet Reconsideration form for this purpose. This issue was brought up at the Minuteman Board of Directors meeting in December.

Other

Allison Potter, Suzanne Kennedy's Administrative Services Assistant, stated that it would be advisable for any non-town group to have insurance – property loss, property damage to others and bodily injury - to cover tables and chairs and other such items the library loans to them. The town's deductible is $2,500.

In order for a group to serve alcohol at the library, they would have to submit an application to the Board of Selectmen for a one-day/special license.

As he has done previously, Gary Berset, of RE/MAX, donated to the library $500 of his commission on the sale of a home, which was greatly appreciated.



Margaret Perkins



Budget Impact

Department Name: Library







Budget
Account # Account Name Amount Cut/ Unfunded Costs
FY2012 FY2013
01610002-5240 Library RM Miscellaneous $3,866
$5,784 $5,411
01610002-5521 Library Books & Periodicals $20,500
- $1
01610002-5427 Library Media Materials $14,500
- $1
01610002-5111 Library Part Time Salaries (a) $3,995
$66,692 $69,546
01610002-5710 Library Instate Travel $165
-
01610001-5110 Library Full Time Salaries $80,000
$78,624 $82,173
01610002-5380 Library Other Purchase Srvcs $3,830
$22,707 $23,222
01610002-5111 Library Part Time Salaries (b) $2,170
$66,692 $69,546
01610002-5111 Library Part Time Salaries (c) $7,521
$66,692 $69,546
01610002-5400 Library Supplies $300
$1,600 $1,600







TOTAL UNFUNDED $'s $136,847














Impact Description




01610002-5240 Amount spent on repairs and maintenance to keep the Library building even minimally repaired and maintained is far more than amount in the FY2013 budget - costs have been shifted to Tuchinsky Interest to meet the level budget requirement.



01610002-5521 To remain certified the Library needs to spend approximately $35,000 from donations and State Aid to meet the materials requirement.



01610002-5427 To remain certified the Library needs to spend approximately $35,000 from donations and State Aid to meet the materials requirement. Media Materials costs include $3,800 - $7,600 to Minuteman Library Network for eBooks/downloadable audiobooks.



01610002-5111 a A total of $3,356 of the Part Time salary budget has been shifted to Tuchinsky Interest to meet the level funded (reflecting municipal contract rates) salary budget requirementt - since 9/1/11 an additional 4 hours/week of staffing has been added to enable the Library to be open an additional 4 hours/week at a cost of $3,356 in FY13



01610002-5710 Travel expenses to meetings, primarily to Minuteman Library Network, are unfunded, and have been shifted to Donations.



UNFUNDED INITIATIVES




01610001-5110 Initiative 1: Initiate a search and hire a Full-Time Library Director



01610002-5380 Initiative 2:  Offer additional educational programming for adults, families, teens, and children: funding for performers/presentersplan & run programs.



01610002-5111 b Initiative 2: Offer additional educational programming for adults, families, teens, and children: funding for 10 additional staff hrs/month to plan and run programs



01610002-5111 c Initiative 3: Increase the number of hours open to 40/week, which would meet the Hours Open Requirement and allow the Library to receive the maximum amount of State Aid



01610002-5400 Initiative 4: Support patrons’ access to eBooks by working with local organizations and businesses to obtain eReaders for patrons and staff to use in the Library in order to familiarize themselves with the technology. Cost Range: Free, if donated, to $300




Budget Narrative


OFFICES OF THE

LIBRARY



VISION STATEMENT:


Medway Public Library will be recognized in the community as an essential and reliable partner in the delivery of information resources, education, self-advancement, and recreation.



MISSION STATEMENT:


Medway Public Library is an indispensable part of the community, dedicated to providing residents of all ages with dynamic collections, innovative programs and wide-ranging and sustainable services.


DESCRIPTION:


Medway Library has 4851 registered borrowers. On average, every week we serve 1300 people of all ages, handle 66 reference requests, host 86 public computer internet users, and circulate nearly 2100 items. We host a diverse mix of Library-sponsored programs, art shows, Scout troops and other community groups, sport signups, theatrical performances, Community Education classes, story times, and meetings of town boards.


Collection

The Library’s collection contains over 72,000 volumes, including books, audio books, CDs, DVDs, and magazines. The Library’s electronic presence includes a website and a wide range of electronic resources and services. These include access to eBooks and downloadable audio books provided by the Minuteman Library Network, and both in-library and remote access to many databases provided not only by Medway Library but also by the Massachusetts Board of Library Commissioners and the Minuteman Library Network. These resources include full text journal articles, reference and job search resources, and area newspapers.


Library Catalog

The library catalog interface provided by Minuteman offers patrons an easy way to: find materials; reserve books, audio books, CDs, videos, DVDs, eBooks, downloadable audio books, and games; renew items; and pay fines and manage library accounts online. E-commerce functionality allows patrons to use credit cards to pay fines via computer at any time.


Interlibrary Loan

Thanks to our Library certification, Medway residents enjoy borrowing privileges for over six million items. Residents are very pleased with their ability to obtain books, periodicals, and audiovisual materials in person and through inter-library loan.


Technology

The Library has a strong technology infrastructure. Technology serves a vital library function. It continues to increase in importance as a tool for patrons using eBooks, downloadable audiobooks, office software products, online networks, databases, and connecting to others around the world.


The Library is also equipped with a photocopy machine, a high quality public printer, a fax machine, a scanner, and 10 public Internet access computers. Wireless technology, introduced a few years ago, extends services to a new cadre of users equipped with their own laptops and other digital devices.



STAFFING



Two full-time and five part-time staff work a total of 141 hours per week. These part-time positions include an Acting Library Director, and four Library Assistants. The full- time positions are the Technical Services (cataloging) and Circulation Services Librarians.



2011 MAJOR INITIATIVES & ACCOMPLISHMENTS



The Library Board adopted a five-year Strategic Plan.


Medway School Superintendent Judith Evans facilitated the Library’s access to school facilities and key personnel. Our staff met with school librarians, who planned to share project information so the Library can provide educational resources more effectively.


One hundred and seventy children participated in the summer reading program. The Medway Cultural Council funded a Celtic music family concert and a puppeteer as part of our summer reading activities. We held a weekly science program in conjunction with 4-H. In November, a preschool fair was held, where residents connected to community preschools. The Medway Players’ Fall and Spring productions brought live theater to 300 people. The Friends of the Library hosted their second annual Gingerbread Festival, and a fundraising concert by Southern Rail Bluegrass. We had over 67,000 patron visits to the Library in FY 2011.


The Department of Public Services (DPS) conducted a comprehensive audit and worked with the Library Director to define Capital priorities, a Capital Plan, and a clear process for reporting building issues to ensure timely repairs and adequate ongoing maintenance.


2012 MAJOR INITIATIVES & ACCOMPLISHMENTS:



As of September, the Library is now open 36 hours a week, with expanded hours (10-8) on Mondays. Staffing for the additional 4 weekly hours is largely funded by Tuchinsky Fund Interest. Circulation at the Library has increased by 8.4% for the period September-November of 2011, compared to the same months of the previous year.


For five days following the hurricane, the Library opened at 8:30 am for Internet use, charging electronics, and bathrooms for patrons without power at home. As many as 20 grateful patrons came on a single day.


The Library added a self-checkout station and a donated new scanner, and converted the fax machine to public access.


In response to patron requests, the Library has added numerous museum passes, funded through Memorial Donations and donations from individuals and local banks. The Library has also added an online museum pass reservation system to streamline processing while improving patron service.

Working with the Department of Public Services, the Library has evaluated building maintenance needs and submitted Capital Improvement Plan requests for 2012-2017. Two broken HVAC units were replaced, restoring normal heating and cooling capability. The Town has contracted with a vendor to replace the thermostatic controls with a computerized setup in the Library. The installation of these controls is nearing completion. The Library secured a reliable cleaning service, providing thorough weekly cleaning and additional cleanings of the public restrooms using municipal funds designated for that purpose.


One hundred and seventy-nine children participated in the summer reading program. The Medway Cultural Council funded the Creature’s Teachers program, a family music night, and a Poi workshop. Well over 100 people attended these programs and a program with Penny the Therapy Dog. The Medway Cultural Council has also funded an upcoming family astronomy program.


We worked with Simmons College Graduate School of Library and Information Science to host a wonderful volunteer summer intern, who held six Summer of Science programs in conjunction with 4-H, and 10 story times for toddlers and preschoolers. Attendance at these well-received programs totaled 151.


Library staff worked with the Senior Center to start a monthly book group there, leading the first three meetings. The Library also coordinated with the Holliston Public Library on the launch of a new morning book group held in Holliston, which also welcomes Medway patrons.



FY 2013 GOALS & INITIATIVES


Goal 1: Library services will be accessible, courteous and responsive to the needs of the community.


Goal 2: The Library will meet the public’s needs for current and popular materials, information, education, culture and entertainment.


Goal 3: Residents of all ages will regard the Medway Library as a prominent place to meet and interact with others in the community.


Goal 4: Residents will have access to a variety of innovative programs.


Goal 5: Library patrons will have access to high quality information technology.


Goal 6: The Library will develop a comprehensive public relations campaign to increase visibility and raise the public’s awareness of the many services and opportunities available.


Goal 7: Medway Public Library will be an inviting and safe part of the community.


Goal 8: The Library will explore creative ways to ensure fiscal sustainability of library services.


Initiative 1: Initiate a search and hire a Full-Time Library Director


Initiative 2: Offer additional educational programming for adults, families, teens, and children


Initiative 3: Increase the number of hours open to 40/week, which would meet the Hours Open Requirement and allow the Library to receive the maximum amount of State Aid.


Initiative 4: Support patrons’ access to eBooks by working with local organizations and businesses to obtain eReaders for patrons and staff to use in the Library in order to familiarize themselves with the technology.





PERFORMANCE MEASURES/INDICATORS



The Library will use comparative ranking information provided by the Board of Library Commissioners to evaluate its performance. These consist of: hours open, circulation, collection size, library visits, computer use, and programming and outreach.


BOARD OF SELECTMEN’S BUDGET POLICY IMPACT


Although this budget allows us to meet the minimum Hours Open Requirement and the Municipal Appropriation Requirement, to remain certified we need to spend approximately $35,000 from donations and State Aid to meet the materials requirement. Even spending these additional funds from our reserves, at this funding level it is
impossible for us to provide sufficient resources to support school projects and community needs, or to meet the high demand for current materials in a variety of formats.

Furthermore, to keep the Library building even minimally repaired and maintained, we also need to spend approximately $3900 of Tuchinsky interest based on past experience. This is in addition to the cleaning funded in the DPS's budget in FY12.  These expenses and the expenses for circulating library materials far outstrip our annual donation income.

Below is a comparison of Medway's library spending to that of surrounding towns'.  As you can see, Medway's library spending (total and per capita) is by far the lowest of the surrounding towns. Medway's operating budget should fund all basic Library operating
costs, including materials and routine repairs/maintenance.  That would allow us to use donations to provide additional services to the schools and public.

Library use nationwide by those who have been economically impacted by the recession (over a third of families) has increased by 37%.  There is a high demand for additional programming for children and adults. There are also numerous requests for instruction in the use of eReaders and downloadable audiobooks. It is important for the Library
to address the needs of all of our patrons, by adding more services for children and seniors, programming and materials related to career assistance, and more open hours for access to the Internet.


Municipality

Library Population Groupings

Total Appropriated Municipal Income--Operating

Appropriated Municipal Income per capita

TAMI as a percent of Total Operating Income

Per Capita Income

Per capita TAMI as a percent of Per Capita income








Medway

10,000-14,999

$204,315

$15.84

95.45%

$40,735

0.04%

Hopkinton

10,000-14,999

$338,060

$23.06

68.98%

$57,285

0.04%

Franklin

25,000-49,999

$778,622

$24.27

92.60%

$37,559

0.06%

Holliston

10,000-14,999

$416,850

$29.37

92.00%

$44,625

0.07%

Medfield

10,000-14,999

$592,759

$48.29

96.95%

$55,786

0.09%

Bellingham

15,000-24,999

$448,758

$28.31

93.87%

$31,786

0.09%

Millis

5,000-9,999

$301,580

$37.54

92.61%

$36,657

0.10%

Norfolk

10,000-14,999

$441,706

$39.48

92.20%

$36,670

0.11%

Milford

25,000-49,999

$1,037,278

$37.56

94.44%

$30,663

0.12%